<html>
<head>
<style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 10pt;
font-family:Tahoma
}
--></style>
</head>
<body class='hmmessage'><div dir='ltr'>
After teaching 30,100 people to solder (a rough estimate), I'll lend my&nbsp;experience&nbsp;about this.<BR>&nbsp;<BR>Wet sponges&nbsp;may or may not&nbsp;wear out tips&nbsp;faster (I have not experienced faster wear due to this myself) but using wet sponges to clean tips&nbsp;is a very effective and very easy way to keep tips clean.&nbsp; And given that tips are very&nbsp;cheap, and sponges are really cheap, and teaching people to solder is the goal, I&nbsp;teach people to&nbsp;use wet sponges to keep tips clean.&nbsp; (But:&nbsp;they must be cellulose sponges, and not those foam plastic ones.)<BR>&nbsp;<BR>There are two things that&nbsp;are key to&nbsp;soldering well:<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 1)&nbsp; keeping tips clean as you solder!<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 2)&nbsp; holding the solder iron on the connection for 1 second&nbsp;after you pull the solder away (to give the solder time to flow)!<BR>For all the other details, here's the way I teach soldering:<BR><a href="http://www.mightyohm.com/soldercomic">http://www.mightyohm.com/soldercomic</a><BR>&nbsp;<BR>For my&nbsp;decent (not great) Weller soldering station that I have used since&nbsp;1978 (wow, that was a long time ago!), I have changed my tip maybe 10 times&nbsp;(and I solder a lot!).&nbsp; And I have always used&nbsp;a wet sponge to clean my tip.&nbsp; Good tips are plated with&nbsp;some sort of metal that makes it very easy to keep clean.<BR>&nbsp;<BR>Jimmie Rodgers, who also teaches zillions of people to solder (often with me), really loves brass pads to clean tips.&nbsp; They&nbsp;work great!&nbsp;&nbsp;We don't go around the world&nbsp;using them for teaching, however, since wet sponges are so easy, and so cheap, and so effective.<BR>&nbsp;<BR>BTW, the greatest place for people in the US to get soldering stuff is:<BR><a href="http://www.mpja.com">http://www.mpja.com</a><BR>They sell almost everything you need for really&nbsp;great prices.&nbsp; If you are getting 10 or more setups, then it is even cheaper.&nbsp; Here's a list of things I&nbsp;recommend&nbsp;hackerspaces (and&nbsp;Maker Faires, and other places where I do workshops) to buy for giving workshops:<BR>&nbsp;<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp; soldering station&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 15860 TL&nbsp;&nbsp; $14.95 for 1&nbsp;&nbsp; $13.95 for 10<br>&nbsp;&nbsp; replacement 1/32" tip&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 15862 TL&nbsp;&nbsp; $ 1.95 for 1&nbsp;&nbsp; $ 1.75 for 10<br>&nbsp;&nbsp; needle-nose pliers&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 15397 TL&nbsp;&nbsp; $ 1.95 for 1&nbsp;&nbsp; $ 1.75 for 10<br>&nbsp;&nbsp; wire cutter&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 16498 TL&nbsp;&nbsp; $ 1.95 for 1&nbsp;&nbsp; no quantity discount<br>&nbsp;&nbsp; wire stripper&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 11714 TL&nbsp;&nbsp; $ 3.69 for 1&nbsp;&nbsp; $ 3.35 for&nbsp; 5<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp; solder sucker&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 0041 TL&nbsp;&nbsp; $ 3.95 for 1&nbsp;&nbsp; $ 2.95 for&nbsp; 5<br>&nbsp;&nbsp; replacement tip for sucker&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 9178 TL&nbsp;&nbsp; $.0.69 for 1&nbsp;&nbsp; $ 0.59 for&nbsp; 5<br>&nbsp;&nbsp; solder wick&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 16433 TL&nbsp;&nbsp; $ 0.75 for 1&nbsp;&nbsp; $ 0.69 for&nbsp; 5<br>&nbsp;&nbsp; solder, 60/40, 0.038", 1lb.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 4457 TL&nbsp;&nbsp; $16.95 for 1&nbsp;&nbsp; $15.95 for&nbsp; 5<BR>&nbsp;<BR>Also,&nbsp;Tip Tinner&nbsp;works really well for cleaning tips, but it makes horribly nastsy fumes!&nbsp; I travel&nbsp;with it for workshops, since it can really rejuvinate oxidized&nbsp;tips on cheap irons.&nbsp; Jameco and Radio Shack, and many other places sell it:<BR>Jameco part number&nbsp; 2094215&nbsp; 1 for $8.95<BR>&nbsp;<BR>Jameco also sells brass cleaning pads:<BR>Jameco part number&nbsp; 156777&nbsp; 1 for $4.95&nbsp;&nbsp; (with a stand)<BR>Jameco part number&nbsp; 160004&nbsp; 1 for $2.49&nbsp;&nbsp; (replacement pads)<BR>&nbsp;<BR><a href="http://www.jameco.com">http://www.jameco.com</a><BR>&nbsp;<BR>&nbsp;<BR>Philosophical aside:<BR>For all of this (and for all of life), I recommend pondering this:&nbsp; there may be ways of doing things that you really love (and I'm sure there are!).&nbsp; But it is pretty rare to find&nbsp;one single&nbsp;CORRECT (or right) (or best) way of&nbsp;doing something that is&nbsp;THE one correct and right and best way of doing (or teaching) something.&nbsp; There are lots of ways to get a job done.&nbsp; There are also religions&nbsp;on our&nbsp;bizarre and beautiful planet that claim to KNOW the one single correct and right and best way for things.&nbsp; If something works well for you, then I hope you will&nbsp;explore it.&nbsp; If, after exploring,&nbsp;it turns out not to be so&nbsp;great, or&nbsp;you find ways that are better for you, then please explore those ways.&nbsp; Keep doing that, and you get better at doing whatever it is you do.&nbsp; And it feels really nice.&nbsp; :)<BR>&nbsp;<BR>Mitch.<br><br>&nbsp;<BR><div><hr id="stopSpelling">Date: Mon, 4 Jul 2011 13:03:52 -0700<br>From: froggytoad@gmail.com<br>To: lee@lee.org<br>CC: noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net<br>Subject: Re: [Noisebridge-discuss] new soldering irons for Crucible?<br><br><br><br><div class="ecxgmail_quote">On Sat, Jul 2, 2011 at 10:39 AM, Lee Sonko <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:lee@lee.org">lee@lee.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote style="padding-left: 1ex; border-left-color: rgb(204, 204, 204); border-left-width: 1px; border-left-style: solid;" class="ecxgmail_quote">
<div class="ecxgmail_quote">The Kinetics &amp; Electronics department at the Crucible has several <a href="http://www.parts-express.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?Partnumber=374-100" target="_blank">$12 Stahl soldering irons</a>, some still new in the box, but they sure wear out quick. Kids take their toll on an iron pretty quick. Do you think we'd get 4 times the value out of the new <a href="http://www.sparkfun.com/products/9672" target="_blank">$40 Hakko 936 knockoff from Sparkfun</a>? Better temperature control might keep the tips and units alive longer. Might you have any other suggested irons?<div>


<br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>I'm afraid that if you end up buying the more expensive irons and people overheat them it won't make much of a difference as they will wear out just the same.&nbsp;Perhaps your adjustable irons are running too hot and wearing the element and the tips out faster. &nbsp;Are you seeing too much tip wear or are the elments burning out? &nbsp;&nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div><div>The Xytronic irons from Jameco have an slot adjuster built into the handle that most people don't/can't mess with without a standard screwdriver handy. &nbsp;Noisebridge has a handful of those. &nbsp;They still work after 2.5 years of abuses. We also have a bunch of 1-3mm wide chisel tips installed on these irons that have a decent sized mass compared to smaller tips that can cycle excessively when used by beginners.</div>
<div><br></div><div>The tips on these Xytronic irons at Noisebridge aren't in great shape, they are corroding from too much water (see the sponge discussion on a new thread created in response to your original post), but they can be rehabilitated or replaced and should continue to solder on.</div>
<div><br></div><div>-rma</div><div><br></div></div>
<br>_______________________________________________
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list
Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net
https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</div>                                               </div></body>
</html>