On Sat, Sep 17, 2011 at 4:56 PM, Rubin Abdi <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:rubin@starset.net">rubin@starset.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
Jonathan Lassoff wrote, On 2011-09-17 15:41:<br>
<div class="im">&gt; I&#39;m not for excluding everyone by default, but I think we should meet with<br>
&gt; and get to know total strangers before just granting them total and free<br>
&gt; access by default.<br>
<br>
</div>Folks asking for lock down should maybe work towards making sure every<br>
single person being let into the space is welcomed, this will solve most<br>
of the problems brought up in this thread.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>In an ideal world, this could work. But, I think it falls down in practice.</div><div><br></div><div>The downside (totally my opinion), is that it requires the *constant* vigilance, at all hours of the day. It places the burden of security and screening strangers on a minority of people that feel engaged and and outgoing enough to want to greet people and observe their behavior to determine if they&#39;re a problem or not.</div>
<div><br></div><div>I don&#39;t think this is fair for the volunteers that take this on. What if they want to work uninterrupted for a while?</div><div>I feel like I should be greeting people while I&#39;m a the space, but I&#39;d much rather not have to worry about who&#39;s coming and going.</div>
<div><br></div><div>I feel like we&#39;ve been going down this road for a while, and it&#39;s not working (things are missing, belligerent strangers are wandering in and harassing people, etc.)</div><div><br></div><div>--j</div>
</div>