Tweetdeck occasionally eats my tweets -- but probably not because of Twitter. There are no limits to how a desktop application can fail, heh. In the end, these are just tweets.<div><br></div><div>~Griffin<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">
On Fri, Dec 2, 2011 at 2:45 PM, John Adams <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jna@retina.net">jna@retina.net</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">On Fri, Dec 2, 2011 at 11:34 AM, rachel lyra hospodar <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:rachelyra@gmail.com" target="_blank">rachelyra@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><div class="im">
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<p>Maybe he means how it&#39;s always been a buggy web service that occasionally sloughs info. It&#39;s actually gotten a lot better in that regard over the last year or two. Their recent whispersys acquisition points to some interest in their part on protecting people&#39;s info.</p>

</blockquote></div><div>As a member of both the early Twitter operations team and Twitter security team I feel like I have to set the record straight here. It&#39;s offensive to me to have anyone write off four years of my and other teams work as &#39;a buggy service that occasionally sloughs info&#39;.  We process many thousands of messags second, with ample capacity to handle major world events such as the London riots and sporting events. </div>

<div><br></div><div>We&#39;ve worked extremely hard in the face of a ridiculous level of growth (from 250k users to &gt; 100 M active users in under four years) and maintain thousands of servers, a far cry from when we strugged with the onslaught of requests to a new and emerging service. </div>
</div></blockquote></div>
</div>