On Sun, Dec 4, 2011 at 1:26 AM, Ryan Rawson <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ryanobjc@gmail.com">ryanobjc@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
However, this situation may be actually the case. The patriot act<br>
gives the US Government wide ranging powers. One of the major powers<br>
is the NSL and accompanying gag order.  Why a subpoena was used in the<br>
case you are describing is not clear, but almost certainly NSLs have<br>
been delivered to twitter and they have executed on it.  What else is<br>
in the bag of tricks?  Remember, the NSL gag orders threads are<br>
personal.  That means if the sysadmin who is requested to pull data<br>
blabs, then the federal government will put that person in jail.  Your<br>
legal department wont be able to do anything about it.</blockquote><div><br></div><div>I understand how NSLs work. I (may have) had to respond to some of them (at some company) but I wouldn&#39;t be able to tell you if I (did or did not.)</div>
<div><br></div><div>Warrants are used for account contacts and Subpoenas for information to identify user accounts. The PATRIOT act allows for these requests but to order a company to censor? </div><div><br></div><div>I have never seen one with that sort of a request before, ever. </div>
<div><br></div><div>-j</div><div><br></div></div></div>