I have read a little bit of Whitehead and by one of his students, and have one of his books and another that attempts to explain it. I have also read a pretty deep book by a computer scientist that tries to relate Ontology in CS and in Philosopy. Ontology in CS just means stuff like Object Oriented vs Procedural vs Functional language, that is what is the best way to describe a problem and an algorithmic solution. Ontology in Philosophy is about what the stuff or nature of the world is, as a necessary precursor to a Theory of Knowledge or Epistemology. In On The Origin of Objects, CS prof Brian C. Smith attempting a description which includes both disciplines proposed that the two fields are tied together dependently, but he never really completed his theory planned to include practicality.<br>
<br>I think that the objects, processes, functions none of are the main things rather the relations between them. How to make this practical then if it would be useful is a question. People who claim that all computer languages are equivalent because of Turing I do not believe because there are practical concerns such as useability and codeability and efficiency and so forth, even if they all make sense in some sort of limit, it is obvious that the best approach currently is problem dependent and so perhaps there is a more universal approach which might help us to achieve great gains in terms of the above issues, if so it would be something as a breakthrough as the Object Oriented languages were.<br>
<br>I would like to return to reading the Whitehead stuff this year as I have only really peeked at it although I own these two books as I said.<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Dec 30, 2011 at 2:13 PM, Ryan Rawson <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ryanobjc@gmail.com">ryanobjc@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">See the problem with this &#39;process philosophy&#39; is it sounds like a<br>
MODEL of the real world to me, rather than &quot;how it works&quot;.  Without an<br>
evidential backing, how can this process philosophy be anything other<br>
than wishful thinking?<br>
<br>
As for the computer science side of things, ultimately when you get<br>
down to it, everything is bits and bytes and CPU instructions. So we<br>
can talk in terms of floating point precisions, ranges of integers,<br>
memory sizes, cpu speed, etc.<br>
<br>
And on a more &#39;out there&#39; moment, it would require a computer with as<br>
much computing power that is implied by the universe itself to<br>
simulate the universe. That is we can consider the universe as a<br>
real-time computing platform that is simulating itself, and all the<br>
computations that would be required to make it happen would also have<br>
to be replicated. Eg: all the quantum interactions and other processes<br>
that build up and cause reality.  Futhermore, we cant simulate reality<br>
because we dont know how it fully works yet.  So whatever we build as<br>
a simulation is merely a model of reality, and thus will always<br>
diverge from it in eventually (presumably?) important ways.<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br>
On Fri, Dec 30, 2011 at 1:08 PM, Caleb Grayson &lt;<a href="mailto:calebgrayson@gmail.com">calebgrayson@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt; Well.. I&#39;m not sure. I&#39;m more of a philosopher than a computer scientist.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; In Whitehead&#39;s Process Philosophy he said everything in reality is a<br>
&gt; function or process that takes in the entire universe at every moment and<br>
&gt; spits out Actual Occasions that become apart of the Creative Advance, the<br>
&gt; history of functional  results in time and space.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; There is a question as to what time an space are. It is m suspicion that<br>
&gt; functions and their solutions are not in time and space, but time and space<br>
&gt; are  in functions and their solutions. Why would times and spaces for which<br>
&gt; nothing is happening be generated by an efficient system?<br>
&gt; CS, if I understand correctly, time and space have to be predefined by<br>
&gt; establishing their numerical domains first.<br>
&gt; I&#39;m hoping CS in its attempt to simulate reality can give inside into it.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Of course CS being a rational/material system has no place to calculate for<br>
&gt; spirit/soul outside of its system which Whitehead does allow for.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; On Dec 30, 2011, at 12:34 PM, Will Sargent &lt;<a href="mailto:will.sargent@gmail.com">will.sargent@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; my particular interest is how simulations handle events in time and space.<br>
&gt;&gt;  how does a simulation taken multiple input from multiple functions or users<br>
&gt;&gt; and align them in time•space.  what would those functions look like?<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Are you talking about multi-agent systems?<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Will.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
</div></div><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5">&gt; _______________________________________________<br>
&gt; Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
&gt; <a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
&gt; <a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
&gt;<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>