<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Dec 30, 2011 at 1:08 PM, Caleb Grayson <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:calebgrayson@gmail.com">calebgrayson@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div bgcolor="#FFFFFF"><div>Well.. I&#39;m not sure. I&#39;m more of a philosopher than a computer scientist. </div><div><br></div><div>In Whitehead&#39;s Process Philosophy he said everything in reality is a function or process that takes in the entire universe at every moment and spits out Actual Occasions that become apart of the Creative Advance, the history of functional  results in time and space. </div>

</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>...wouldn&#39;t Physics be better at answering the question of time and space?</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div bgcolor="#FFFFFF"><div>There is a question as to what time an space are. It is m suspicion that functions and their solutions are not in time and space, but time and space are  in functions and their solutions. Why would times and spaces for which nothing is happening be generated by an efficient system?  </div>

<div>CS, if I understand correctly, time and space have to be predefined by establishing their numerical domains first. </div><div>I&#39;m hoping CS in its attempt to simulate reality can give inside into it. </div></div>

</blockquote><div><br></div><div>CS can only model reality by simulation.  What it&#39;s really good at is concrete math, sets and category theory -- telling you what answers are possible and which are not, which systems can be built and which cannot, which operations are possible and which are not.  There&#39;s an interesting paper that shows all computer programs are formal logic proofs, and you can do fun things by breaking out of a restricted environment to another -- escaping into a wierd machine -- but ultimately it&#39;s always the rules of the machine as defined by the chip.  Whatever world we define in there is simulated, and isn&#39;t going to break out of the instruction pointer of the CPU running it.</div>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div bgcolor="#FFFFFF"><div><br></div><div>Of course CS being a rational/material system has no place to calculate for spirit/soul outside of its system which Whitehead does allow for. </div>

</div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Not at all -- rational / material systems can calculate for soul.  According to the best neurological analysis, the amount of calculated soul is 0.  </div><div><br></div><div><a href="http://edge.org/3rd_culture/sapolsky09/sapolsky09_index.html">http://edge.org/3rd_culture/sapolsky09/sapolsky09_index.html</a></div>

<div><br></div><div>Will.</div></div>