<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Jan 2, 2012 at 6:45 AM, Joshua Juran <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jjuran@gmail.com">jjuran@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div class="im">On Dec 31, 2011, at 5:10 PM, Will Sargent wrote:<br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
CS can only model reality by simulation.  What it&#39;s really good at is<br>
concrete math, sets and category theory -- telling you what answers are<br>
possible and which are not, which systems can be built and which cannot,<br>
which operations are possible and which are not.  There&#39;s an interesting<br>
paper that shows all computer programs are formal logic proofs, and you can<br>
do fun things by breaking out of a restricted environment to another --<br>
escaping into a wierd machine -- but ultimately it&#39;s always the rules of<br>
the machine as defined by the chip.  Whatever world we define in there is<br>
simulated, and isn&#39;t going to break out of the instruction pointer of the<br>
CPU running it.<br>
</blockquote>
<br></div>
Although you can *simulate* a system where something breaks out.  Examples include A-ha&#39;s Take On Me video and Six-Part Ricercar, the final dialogue from Douglas Hofstadter&#39;s Gödel, Escher, Bach.  But you won&#39;t see Alan Turing popping out of the pages of the book or pencil-sketch dude entering your room through the screen.  (Unless of course you&#39;re in some altered state.)</blockquote>

<div><br></div><div>In some sense, that&#39;s every security exploit -- it pops out of the page and starts slouching towards Bethlehem.</div><div><br></div><div>Will.</div></div>