I hear that Noisebridge denizens are interested in learning CPR and first aid. As it happens, I&#39;m a CPR and emergency rescue instructor and can teach a selection of classes. For those who are willing to commit to a full class there&#39;s even a serious, well-recognized qualification available. My CPR classes are accredited by the [American Heart Association](<a href="http://heart.org" target="_blank">http://heart.org</a>), and my first aid classes are accredited by the [American Safety and Health Institute](http://<a href="http://www.hsi.com/ashi/" target="_blank">http://www.hsi.com/ashi/</a>).<br>


<br>Here&#39;s the menu of classes:<br><br><b>Heartsaver CPR with AED</b> [4h]<br>One session teaches you how to save the life of an adult or child whose heart has stopped, or who is choking. The class covers chest compressions, rescue breaths where applicable, and the correct application of an automated external defibrillator. In addition to instruction, there&#39;s plenty of practice on realistic mannequins. Adding infant CPR causes the class to take slightly longer. Fact: learning CPR makes you this awesome: &lt;<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILxjxfB4zNk" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILxjxfB4zNk</a>&gt;<br>


<br><b>First Aid</b> [20h]<br>Over the course of a weekend, you&#39;ll learn how to calmly deal with a variety of emergency situations. Class will include lectures about specific types of injuries, and extensive hands-on time practicing skills.<br>

<br><b>Advanced First Aid</b> [40h]<br>This is a more involved first aid class, focusing on how to stabilize and treat a variety of injuries, and it provides instruction about longer-term care of more serious injuries. As with all other classes, a mix of demonstrations, lectures and hands-on practice is involved.<br>

<br><b>Emergency First Responder</b> [80h]<br>The highest level of medical training typically taken by people who aren&#39;t professional EMTs, this class teaches you to make critical medical decisions in emergent situations, over extended incidents without much assistance.<br>

<br><i>Wilderness</i><br>All of these classes can be taught in a wilderness or austere environment context. An austere context provides more challenges, and involves more critical decision-making and long-term care.<br><br>

Apart from CPR, classes can be broken up into a number of weekly 
sessions of 2-3h, plus homework. Each class also involves a slightly 
longer exam session of about four hours. AFA and EFR also include one or more whole-day or half-day (depending on the schedule) practice scenario sessions. Attendance at all sessions is required for qualification: emergency care is serious business and incomplete knowledge can often be more dangerous than no knowledge. Qualifications are valid for two years, but recertification classes are slightly shorter than than initial certification classes. Some makeup classes may be permitted depending on the class schedule.<br>


<br>If you&#39;d like to take any of these classes, please let me know by email; there&#39;s no need to email the whole list. If there are plenty of applicants for a particular class, I&#39;ll take a look at what the materials costs would be. Running classes involves buying books, CPR mannequins, and moulage, as well as paying administrative and certifications costs. Sadly, this means that classes can&#39;t be totally free. First classes would be more expensive than subsequent because of the need to buy books and other durable resources. I strongly suspect that we&#39;d be able to work out a system to arrange for donations for those who can&#39;t afford it. I can only certify people who are 16 years old, sorry. Those under 16 can still take classes, but they just can&#39;t be certified.<br>


<br>If you have any other questions, please reply to the list!<br><br>Thanks,<br>-Tom<br>