<p>You raise an interesting point. My father manufactured wedding gowns. I worked in the factory for about three years.</p>
<p>Designs were derivative throughout the industry then and they still are. We used to go to fashion shows and I was stunned to see various  women standing outside the showrooms and blatantly drawing the designs. Asian manufacturers would knock off the designs as quickly as they could.</p>

<p>We didn&#39;t spend an ounce of effort fighting the knockoffs and the business grew every year. The knockoffs weren&#39;t the problem; they were a drop in the bucket. The bigger problem was large resellers like J C Penney. They were our largest account and they&#39;d just jerk us around.</p>

<p>Bill</p>

<div class="gmail_quote">On Jan 16, 2012 7:17 AM, &quot;rachel lyra hospodar&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:rachelyra@gmail.com" target="_blank">rachelyra@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br type="attribution"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">


<p><br>
What&#39;s interesting about the example here is that the garment world has no real copyright protections. As a creative producer in the field that is what makes working *possible*, since garment designs are kind of all based on each other.</p>




<p>The reason louis vuitton handbags and the like are covered in brand logos as part of the design?  to permit the prosecution of knockoff artists based on trademark violations.</p>
<p>I don&#39;t actually think that those knockoff artists need to be stopped. Their very existence is a result of the companies&#39; attempts to circumvent the rules of copyright law in their industry, using trademark law.  Frankly I think they deserve what they get and our law enforcement time would be better spent elsewhere.</p>




<p>R.</p>
</blockquote></div>