<span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:pabutusa@gmail.com" target="_blank">pabutusa@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<span>&gt;  I&#39;m part of a &quot;newly rejuvenated&quot; Amateur Radio group in New Jersey the</span><br><span>&gt; &quot;Penn-Jersey Amateur Radio Club&quot;</span><br><br><span>&gt; At a recent meeting someone brought up the topic of going for 501(c)(3)</span><br>

&gt; <span>status ..... while it sounds interesting I&#39;m not sure if it&#39;s worth the</span><br><span>&gt; effort???</span><br><br>Just
 to take the other side of the argument, getting 501(c)(3) status has 
some hassles associated with it, like suddenly you need a &quot;board of 
directors&quot; and so on; there are some political restrictions on what 
you&#39;re allowed to do afterwards (you can&#39;t endorse a political 
candidate, for example); and you might find that you&#39;ve got higher 
visibility and scrutiny from agencies  like the IRS -- it would be a 
serious no-no, for example, to try to run a for-profit business with 
501(c)(3) tax exempt status, so you&#39;d better make sure that nothing you 
do looks too much like a business  (e.g. &quot;Fred put in a lot of effort on
 this fund-raising campaign, he deserves to take a cut off the top&quot;). <br>
<br>I know of one organization that arguably screwed up once it became a
 legit non-profit-- they were getting lots grants for this and that, 
they had lots of hired employees, but they suddenly hit a wall and 
nearly lost it.  There&#39;s an endemic problem with relying on grant money:
 it rarely covers operating expenses, so if you don&#39;t have a strong 
source of some other kind of income there&#39;s a temptation to start 
juggling money from one account to another in hopes of paying it back 
when times are better.  I bet the &quot;board of directors&quot; there regrets not
 demanding a stronger financial accounting-- if I understand correctly, 
hypothetically they could be liable for some of the debts of the 
organization.  <br>
<br>So, if you don&#39;t really need the 501(c)(3) status (e.g. for 
encouraging donations) it might be better to hang loose.   For example, 
the Burning Man org originally decided that they really didn&#39;t want to 
be a non-profit, and for quite a few years they managed to do a lot of 
good work as an LLC.   It&#39;s only recently that they started going the 
non-profit route when they started wondering things like &quot;what happens 
to this thing after we&#39;re dead?<br>
<br><br>