<html><head></head><body bgcolor="#FFFFFF"><div>Would it be better to dispose of a motherboard and keep the case for your new laptop, or would it be better to give the old laptop to somebody else?</div><div><br></div><div>I suspect that the case is a fairly small component of the resources needed to build a laptop.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>Laptops are getting smaller and smaller, and the space for multiple connectorized modules isn't there.&nbsp;</div><div><br>Thanks,<div><br></div><div>gopi@iPhone</div><div><br></div></div><div><br>On Jan 21, 2012, at 21:44, Brian Morris &lt;<a href="mailto:cymraegish@gmail.com">cymraegish@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br><br></div><div></div><blockquote type="cite"><div>Back in the 90s Apple made a bunch of notebooks computers with upgradeable cpu "daughtercards" that could extend the life of the machine by several years. I happen to have three of these (two upgraded) in my collection and could supply pictures of the guts if desired (although my camera is pretty shabby 2mpxl = web only)<br>
<br>Amazingly although they haven't done that in a decade, just a few years ago they made a notebook with an upgradeable graphics card.<br><br>I think that if they wanted to they could standardize motherboards in their laptops so that when case designs remain the same they could be upgraded even if no daughtercards (such as going from a core2duo to an i5 maybe.<br>
<br>I also have a G4 powermac upgraded to a 3x faster cpu. The G5 models all had different cpu sockets and no upgrades were possible even by 3rd parties due to Apple proprietary knowledge. Prior to the g5 all mac towers were upgradeable for the cpu and graphics cards as well.<br>
<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Jan 20, 2012 at 11:19 AM, Mitch Altman <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:maltman23@hotmail.com">maltman23@hotmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<br>
While I was in Berlin, at 28C3, I met Anna Salzberg, a French journalist doing a long, well researched story on planned obsolescence.<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
She is interested in seeing how companies purposely (and otherwise) make products that are designed to break within a certain length of time, or are purposely made obsolete by newer products that are not compatible with older products -- where the net effect is that you "need" to throw away your old product and buy a new one.<br>

<br>
<br>
<br>
She is still doing research for this story, which, I think, will be really good and worthwhile when it comes it.<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
If you would like to be interviewed for the story, please contact Anna directly. &nbsp;She is cc-ed on this email.<br>
<br>
<a href="mailto:anna.salzberg@pltv.fr">anna.salzberg@pltv.fr</a><br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
If you prefer, all comments are annonymous and confidential.<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
If you work at a company that may be engaged in this kind of planning (either purposely, or otherwise), Anna will especially like to hear from you.<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
Best,<br>
<br>
Mitch.<br>
<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br>
</div></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><div><span>_______________________________________________</span><br><span>Noisebridge-discuss mailing list</span><br><span><a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a></span><br><span><a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a></span><br></div></blockquote></body></html>