<div><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Mar 3, 2012 at 2:31 PM, Jared Dunne <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jareddunne@gmail.com">jareddunne@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
NB-<br><br>My gf spilled a decent amount of water on my old 17&quot; MBP&#39;s keyboard the other day.  I was wondering if people with experience with similar incidents with A1212 17&quot; MBPs could share some tips.<br><br>
</blockquote><div><br></div><div>That sucks.</div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">The next day I put back in the battery and powered it up.  It worked fine except some of the keys were &quot;stuck&quot;, meaning it was acting like they were held down, namely some combination of shift, control, and command.  The behavior was that when I typed everything was in all CAPS and numbers were punctuation, etc.  Also when I clicked links in the web browser they opened in new windows.</blockquote>
<div> </div><div>The command key is shorted, or lines running from it are.</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">I&#39;ve removed the keyboard again and removed the keys that were still having issues.  There isn&#39;t anything obviously afoul with them, aside from there being some dusty/cloudy appearance between the layers of transparent plastic housing the connections to/from the nubs that get depressed, which isn&#39;t dramatic different than the appearance surrounding the working keys.<br>
</blockquote><div> </div><div><br></div><div>That&#39;s called corrosion and it&#39;s what happens when water hits a live circuit. The water mixed with whatever junk was in your laptop and formed a nice fluid with resistance and all sorts of other lovely properties.</div>
<div><br></div><div>One trick I&#39;ve used in the past is a pencil eraser to remove corrosion from the mylar traces on the plastic, but really, you need a new keyboard.</div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Questions:<br>- Could the behavior be caused by a incomplete connection of the ribbon cable?  Or would that cause boot errors or all-or-none behavior?  Tips on getting that ribbon cable in snugly despite the lack of slack in the cable?<br>
</blockquote><div><br></div><div>What&#39;s on that cable is the keyboard matrix going to the controller chip. You could have shorts there, or worse yet, the water has shorted the keyboard controller chip&#39;s inputs. rendering the chip useless. </div>
<div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

- Did I screw up by rinsing it off? </blockquote><div><br></div><div>Possibly There&#39;s more in city water than just water. If you&#39;d rinsed with distilled water here or even a mild alcohol, you may have been better off.</div>
<div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"> Alternatively, did I not go far enough in my rinse?<br>- Any other tips on what I should do next?  Clearly I can buy a replacement, but I&#39;d like to eliminate the possibility of repair before doing so.</blockquote>
<div><br></div><div>With things like keyboards and mice, I&#39;m always of the opinion that they&#39;re unfixable unless you&#39;re very lucky. ifixit has your keyboard for either $69 or $99 depending on model and it sounds like you&#39;ve already wasted enough time on this problem. Pony up.</div>
<div><br></div><div>-john</div></div>