<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    You could try washing it with an alcohol solution (rubbing alcohol),
    and hoping that displaces enough of the material to fix the problem,
    but chances are you'll need to replace the keyboard. <br>
    On 3/3/12 2:31 PM, Jared Dunne wrote:
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CAFZrgi-LmZY-7Xc2SQEoVxhTxmxE37j+LQm-saMgoNNP_d3rYw@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">NB-<br>
      <br>
      My gf spilled a decent amount of water on my old 17" MBP's
      keyboard the other day.&nbsp; I was wondering if people with experience
      with similar incidents with A1212 17" MBPs could share some tips.<br>
      <br>
      I immediately turned it off, unplugged, and removed the battery.&nbsp;
      I inverted it and wiped down as much of the water as possible.&nbsp; I
      left it inverted overnight.<br>
      <br>
      The next day I put back in the battery and powered it up.&nbsp; It
      worked fine except some of the keys were "stuck", meaning it was
      acting like they were held down, namely some combination of shift,
      control, and command.&nbsp; The behavior was that when I typed
      everything was in all CAPS and numbers were punctuation, etc.&nbsp;
      Also when I clicked links in the web browser they opened in new
      windows.<br>
      <br>
      I found some helpful videos on <a moz-do-not-send="true"
        href="http://www.powerbookmedic.com">http://www.powerbookmedic.com</a>
      and used them to dissemble the MBP and remove the keyboard.&nbsp; Once
      removed, I was better able to remove various crud that had found
      its way under the keys over the last 4-5 years.&nbsp; I then ran it
      under fresh water (didn't submerge) then allowed it to dry for 36
      hours.<br>
      <br>
      The following evening I tried reassembling the machine.&nbsp; I had
      some trouble getting the keyboard's ribbon cable back snugly into
      it's slot, so I'm not sure that it made a good connection.&nbsp; I
      continued anyways and powered it on.&nbsp; The "stuck" key problem had
      gone away.&nbsp; While most keys now worked, a seemingly random subset
      of them didn't do anything on key press, including T, G, B, left
      shift, tab, command, etc.<br>
      <br>
      I've removed the keyboard again and removed the keys that were
      still having issues.&nbsp; There isn't anything obviously afoul with
      them, aside from there being some dusty/cloudy appearance between
      the layers of transparent plastic housing the connections to/from
      the nubs that get depressed, which isn't dramatic different than
      the appearance surrounding the working keys.<br>
      <br>
      Questions:<br>
      - Could the behavior be caused by a incomplete connection of the
      ribbon cable?&nbsp; Or would that cause boot errors or all-or-none
      behavior?&nbsp; Tips on getting that ribbon cable in snugly despite the
      lack of slack in the cable?<br>
      - Did I screw up by rinsing it off?&nbsp; Alternatively, did I not go
      far enough in my rinse?<br>
      - Any other tips on what I should do next?&nbsp; Clearly I can buy a
      replacement, but I'd like to eliminate the possibility of repair
      before doing so.<br>
      <br>
      Thanks!<br>
      Jared-
      <br>
      <fieldset class="mimeAttachmentHeader"></fieldset>
      <br>
      <pre wrap="">_______________________________________________
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a>
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a>
</pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>