Milo, my three year old, and I, watched a special about the DARPA grand challenge.  Apart from the buzz word &quot;DARPA&quot;, there was not a single mote of military propaganda about it.  There was simple idle mention of military, but that was it.<div>
<br></div><div>What did my 3 year old get from the video, &quot;TERRAMAX!&quot; the name of one of the robots.  He also has an understanding of the pain and work and excitement and the energy and the fun that people experience when working on hard projects...<br>
<br>...and in a world where shit is bought at the store, I think that knowledge is critical for our kids. <br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Apr 4, 2012 at 8:46 AM, Lee Sonko <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:lee@lee.org">lee@lee.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div>The age and maturity level of the students being presented with the DARPA message is important to me. Is it alright to have, for instance, army recruiters at colleges? How about high schools? How about elementary schools? </div>

<div><br></div><div>At what age is a person mature enough</div><div>* to go to war (rhetorically the answer is &quot;never&quot; but let&#39;s go beyond that)</div><div>* play war games (cowboys and indians, Americas Army First Person Shooter)</div>

<div>* make war machines (case in point)</div><div><br></div><div>The Army currently recruits in high schools (<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco_Board_of_Education#JROTC" target="_blank">except for San Francisco</a>, if I recall correctly). But certainly not in elementary schools.</div>

<div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div>
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br>Everything should be made as simple as possible, but no simpler - <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Einstein" title="Albert Einstein" target="_blank">Albert Einstein</a><br>

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication -  <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonardo_Da_Vinci" title="Leonardo Da Vinci" target="_blank">Leonardo Da Vinci</a><br>
Perfection is reached not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away -  <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antoine_de_Saint_Exup%C3%A9ry" title="Antoine de Saint Exupéry" target="_blank">Antoine de Saint Exupéry</a><br>

Keep It Simple Stupid - <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clarence_Johnson" title="Clarence Johnson" target="_blank">Kelly Johnson</a><br>
</div>