During my exhausting involvement at Maker Faire this year. I realized two things:<br><ol><li>I didn&#39;t hear anything about DARPA.</li><li>Unless I brought it up, I didn&#39;t hear anything about hacker spaces.</li></ol>
What does this tell me?  This tells me the attempt to spite Maker Faire because of DARPA sponsorship was an utter failure, and not only that, as I predicted, because so many Hacker Space Luminaries were not promoting the movement, the movement was less visible.<br>
<br>How involved in the event was I?<br><br>I represented the following Maker projects:<br><ol><li>TE+ND Rover</li><li>Weeviles</li><li>Tweethaus</li></ol><p>Other projects I have contributed to which were present:</p><ol>
<li>Tympani Lambada</li><li>Brolli Flock</li><li>Dragon Wagon</li><li>TechShop</li><li>Nimby</li><li>The Made<br></li><li>Others I am probably forgetting or didn&#39;t see</li></ol><p>Again, unless I brought up Noisebridge or Hackerspaces, I heard nothing, even with the groups that utilized Noisebridge.  This, of course, doesn&#39;t include &quot;non-hacker spaces&quot; Nimby, Techshop, boxshop, american steel, shipyard, etc, etc.<br>
<br>This lack of visibility is counter productive and leaves Maker Faire with the clear option, seek further sponsorship from DARPA.  Seek less reliance on hacker spaces.</p><p><br></p><p>Yes, it&#39;s your prerogative to protest DARPA&#39;s sponsorship of Maker Faire.  It doesn&#39;t mean it is smart to do so and it doesn&#39;t mean that your efforts aren&#39;t better spent representing Hacker Spaces at Maker Faire.</p>
<p><br></p><p>This protest is a failure.  It is failing hacker spaces as a movement.<br></p>