It appears to be amanufacturerinsertedfeature, as part of protection for FPGA loaded firmware /bit-maskcode.<br><br>&quot;Bogus story: no Chinese backdoor in military chip<div>Today&#39;s big news is that researchers have found proof of Chinese manufacturers putting backdoors in American chips that the military uses. This is false. While they did find a backdoor in a popular FPGA chip, there is no evidence the Chinese put it there, or even that it was intentionally malicious.&quot;</div>
<div><br></div><div><a href="http://erratasec.blogspot.com/2012/05/bogus-story-no-chinese-backdoor-in.html">http://erratasec.blogspot.com/2012/05/bogus-story-no-chinese-backdoor-in.html</a></div><div><br></div><div>-John</div>
<div><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, May 29, 2012 at 8:53 AM, Felipe Sanches <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:juca@members.fsf.org" target="_blank">juca@members.fsf.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<h2>
                                
                                
                                
                        <span> <a href="http://it.slashdot.org/story/12/05/28/1454222/backdoor-found-in-china-made-us-military-chip" target="_blank">Backdoor Found In China-Made US Military Chip?</a></span>
                        
                        
                        
                        

                        
                </h2>
                <div>
                
                Posted
                by 
        
        
                
                        <a href="mailto:samzenpus@slashdot.org" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">samzenpus</a>
                
        
        

        
        
        on Monday May 28, @01:25PM
        
        
                <br>from the protect-ya-neck dept.
        
        </div>
        

        <div>

                


                        <div>
                        <a href="http://honorponcacity.com/" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">Hugh Pickens</a> writes <i>&quot;Information
 Age reports that the Cambridge University researchers have discovered 
that a microprocessor used by the US military but <a href="http://www.information-age.com/channels/security-and-continuity/news/2105468/security-backdoor-found-in-chinamade-us-military-chip.thtml" target="_blank">made in China contains secret remote access capability</a>,
 a secret &#39;backdoor&#39; that means it can be shut off or reprogrammed 
without the user knowing. The &#39;bug&#39; is in the actual chip itself, rather
 than the firmware installed on the devices that use it. This means 
there is no way to fix it than to replace the chip altogether. &#39;The 
discovery of a backdoor in a military grade chip raises some serious 
questions about hardware assurance in the semiconductor industry,&#39; 
writes Cambridge University researcher Sergei Skorobogatov. &#39;It also 
raises some searching questions about the integrity of manufacturers 
making claims about [the] security of their products without independent
 testing.&#39; The unnamed chip, which the researchers claim is widely used 
in military and industrial applications, is &#39;wide open to intellectual 
property theft, fraud and reverse engineering of the design to <a href="https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/%7Esps32/sec_news.html#Assurance" target="_blank">allow the introduction of a backdoor or Trojan</a>&#39;,
 Does this mean that the Chinese have control of our military 
information infrastructure asks Rupert Goodwins? &#39;No: it means that one 
particular chip has an undocumented feature. An unfortunate feature, to 
be sure, to find in a secure system  but <a href="http://www.zdnet.co.uk/news/security-threats/2012/05/28/the-secrets-out-for-secure-chip-design-40155296/" target="_blank">secret ways in have been built into security systems</a> for as long as such systems have existed.&#39;&quot;</i>
 <br><br>Even though this story has been blowing-up on Twitter, there are a few 
caveats. The backdoor doesn&#39;t seem to have been confirmed by anyone 
else, Skorobogatov is a little short on details, and he is trying to 
sell the scanning technology used to uncover the vulnerability.</div>
                        

                
                
        </div>
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br>