> How does a TIG welder have "the potential to produce red hot metal slag if you're using it to remove material"?  I've never heard of this.<br>Citation needed! <div><br></div><div>You know how a TIG works, right? An arc creates a puddle you then can add metal to. In that way you can also use the arc to create a puddle to remove material. That material naturally falls off the piece and potentially onto the floor. I've used the TIG to do just that a number of times as an alternative to cutting and grinding.</div>
<div><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Aug 17, 2012 at 4:14 PM, Jake <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:jake@spaz.org" target="_blank">jake@spaz.org</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Yes, i'm comparing soldering irons to welding machines.  they get hot and give off smoke, and are excellent and useful tools at hackerspaces.<br>
<br>
How does a TIG welder have "the potential to produce red hot metal slag if you're using it to remove material"?  I've never heard of this.<br>
Citation needed!<br>
<br>
"Not everyone knows that welding galvanized metal or chromed metal gives off harmful fumes" but also not everyone knows that using the laser engraver on moleskine notebooks or any plastic with vinyl gives off DEADLY CHLORINE GAS yet we decided to take a huge risk and get a laser engraver anyway - and no one has died yet.<br>

<br>
Have you noticed that we have propane torches?  We also have a drill press, chop saws with no safety buttons, a fucking table-saw (with no hotdog sensor), a laser engraver, and yes, dozens of soldering irons.<br>
<br>
All of these tools have safety precautions.  Don't laser ABS plastic (like what comes out of some of our 3d printers) because it emits CYANIDE GAS and tends to melt.  cutting PVC emits chlorine gas!  yes, people should not use the TIG welder on galvanized metal, they might get the metal flu.<br>

<br>
I think we can handle making a few warning signs, a ventilation system, and a vinyl curtain to block UV rays from escaping.  We are hackers and we are capable of operating dangerous equipment.<br>
<br>
I think we should take Martin up on his offer and get some gloves, masks, and pliers.  I've got one welding mask and set of gloves on it already.<br>
Then Martin will give a demonstration / instruction class and we can all see how excellent TIG welding can be.<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br>
<br>
-jake</font></span><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br>
<br>
On Fri, 17 Aug 2012, Ever Falling wrote:<br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
>  yeah while we're at it, let's put down a metal plate under all the<br>
soldering irons, because they get hot too. <br>
<br>
are you actually comparing soldering irons to welding machines?<br>
<br>
> TIG welding does not throw off hot bits of red-hot metal like MIG or stick<br>
welding. <br>
<br>
You're right but it still has the potential to produce red hot metal slag if<br>
you're using it to remove material.<br>
<br>
>  yes, it's true that people should not weld galvanized metal or chrome.<br>
People should also not hold their soldering iron by the wrong end (if it<br>
smells like chicken, you're holding it wrong) or aim one of our many propane<br>
torches at the piles of wood we have stacked up, while they're using it for<br>
soldering. <br>
<br>
You're either really dumb or acting dumb on purpose. Not everyone knows that<br>
welding galvanized metal or chromed metal gives off harmful fumes though i<br>
think it's pretty obvious you don't hold the hot part of anything like the<br>
end of a soldering iron or point flames towards flammable material if you<br>
don't want to purposely set it on fire. Seriously you're acting really<br>
childish at this point. If you wanna install this in your house with no<br>
safety measures then by all means go ahead but if it's going to be in a<br>
space that caters to dozens of people on property that we don't own then we<br>
should probably look into some safety precautions. I'm sorry we're forcing<br>
the budget for this suggestion beyond the initial $400 but tools like<br>
welders tend to do that.<br>
<br>
On Fri, Aug 17, 2012 at 3:32 PM, Jake <<a href="mailto:jake@spaz.org" target="_blank">jake@spaz.org</a>> wrote:<br>
      yeah while we're at it, let's put down a metal plate under all<br>
      the soldering irons, because they get hot too.<br>
<br>
      TIG welding does not throw off hot bits of red-hot metal like<br>
      MIG or stick welding.<br>
<br>
      OMG!  this guy is going to catch his shirt on fire!  just<br>
      kidding.<br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iC2DG8jVp_M&feature=player_detailpage#t=106s" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?<u></u>v=iC2DG8jVp_M&feature=player_<u></u>detailpage#t=106s</a><br>
<br>
<br>
      by the way, the smoke coming off of his work is the thin layer<br>
      of wax that comes with brand-new metal, to keep it from rusting<br>
      on the shelf. Obviously we will have ventilation but the smoke<br>
      doesn't seem to be any worse than the fumes from SOLDERING which<br>
      we do all the time.<br>
<br>
      yes, it's true that people should not weld galvanized metal or<br>
      chrome. People should also not hold their soldering iron by the<br>
      wrong end (if it smells like chicken, you're holding it wrong)<br>
      or aim one of our many propane torches at the piles of wood we<br>
      have stacked up, while they're using it for soldering.<br>
<br>
      please people, this is TIG welding not some crazy firethrowing<br>
      machine.<br>
<br>
      The following is MIG welding, which I am NOT suggesting for<br>
      noisebridge (although apparently it works fine at AMT, which is<br>
      also made of and full of wood)<br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sMdQT-eswYY&feature=player_detailpage#t=775s" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?<u></u>v=sMdQT-eswYY&feature=player_<u></u>detailpage#t=775s</a><br>
<br>
<br>
      -jake<br>
<br>
<br>
      Ever Falling wrote:<br>
      Matt has a point. At the very least you'd need to put down a<br>
      metal plate or something to cover the wood (maybe we could coat<br>
      the floor in the shop with an epoxy?) because with almost all<br>
      welding you're gonna get sparks and slag coming off your piece.<br>
      Also fumes, not from the shielding gas, but from the metal being<br>
      worked on is a legitimate concern. You just might wanna look up<br>
      which metals we should disallow from welding like galvanized<br>
      metal or chromed steel. I don't think we gotta be OSHA compliant<br>
      or anything but safety is something we should take seriously<br>
      with a piece of equipment like this.<br>
<br>
______________________________<u></u>_________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net" target="_blank">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.<u></u>noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/<u></u>mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-<u></u>discuss</a><br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
</blockquote>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>