<div><b>Item #1</b></div><div><br></div>I have a new friend who is, among other things, a glassblower — makes glass art & such. He's showing me how to do it. Apparently it's not too difficult, he does it in his basement w/out much in the way of setup. I told him he should come to NB b/c I don't know of anyone in the Noiseenclave who works in the medium of glass yet, & perhaps folks would be interested in learning? Or would this lead to the same partykilling safety concerns re: fire hazards & such that plagued the welding workshop? He has been doing it a while & has yet to burn the house down, evidently.<div>
<br></div><div><b>Item #2</b> (complete nonsequitur)</div><div><br></div><div>The Jargon has a neologism <i>gweep</i>, a verb for nighttime hacking. Full entry: </div><div><br></div><div><dt id="gweep" style="font-family:Times">
<a id="gweep"><font color="#3333ff"><b>gweep</b>: <span class="pronunciation">/gweep/</span></font></a></dt><dd style="font-family:Times"><p><a id="gweep" style="color:rgb(51,51,255)">1. <span class="grammar">v.</span> To </a><a href="http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/H/hack.html"><i class="glossterm">hack</i></a><span style="color:rgb(51,51,255)">, usually at night. At WPI, from 1975 onwards, one who gweeped could often be found at the College Computing Center punching cards or crashing the</span><span style="color:rgb(51,51,255)"> </span><a href="http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/P/PDP-10.html"><i class="glossterm">PDP-10</i></a><span style="color:rgb(51,51,255)"> </span><span style="color:rgb(51,51,255)">or, later, the DEC-20. A correspondent who was there at the time opines that the term was originally onomatopoetic, describing the keyclick sound of the Datapoint terminals long connected to the PDP-10; others allege that ‘gweep’ was the sound of the Datapoint's bell (compare</span><span style="color:rgb(51,51,255)"> </span><a href="http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/F/feep.html"><i class="glossterm">feep</i></a><span style="color:rgb(51,51,255)">). The term has survived the demise of those technologies, however, and was still alive in early 1999. “</span><span class="quote" style="color:rgb(51,51,255)">I'm going to go gweep for a while. See you in the morning.</span><span style="color:rgb(51,51,255)">” “</span><span class="quote" style="color:rgb(51,51,255)">I gweep from 8 PM till 3 AM during the week.</span><span style="color:rgb(51,51,255)">”</span></p>
</dd><dd style="font-family:Times"><p><font color="#3333ff">2. <span class="grammar">n.</span> One who habitually gweeps in sense 1; a <a href="http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/H/hacker.html"><i class="glossterm">hacker</i></a>. “<span class="quote">He's a hard-core gweep, mumbles code in his sleep.</span>” Around 1979 this was considered derogatory and not used in self-reference; it has since been proudly claimed in much the same way as <a href="http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/G/geek.html"><i class="glossterm">geek</i></a>.</font></p>
</dd></div><div><div>I don't like <i>gweep</i> so much—it's a good word, but it should mean something else. I propose <i>nack</i> (verb)—simple contraction of night + hack—for latenight hacking. Or <i>nhack</i>, where the h is silent. When I first discovered NB last year, it was the fact it was always open that thrilled me most—lifelong night owl/moon tiger/star dragon/quasivampire that I am. I'm very glad that threats of limited hours made on this list in dark days past never took hold: I for one have nights when a 2am hack is just what the soul needs. </div>
<div><br></div><div>Nhackers Unite! Someone a while back suggested a mailing list for the latenighters, I think....here's a little image to go with it, if that idea comes to fruition.</div></div><div><a href="http://zine.noisebridge.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/art_nbatnight.jpg">http://zine.noisebridge.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/art_nbatnight.jpg</a></div>
<div><br></div><div>K gotta run...comin' up on midnight...time for lunch!</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>--Løng$h@nk$</div><div><br></div><div><div><br></div><div><br></div></div>