I've said it for years: if you want to be more circumspect about your location, remove the battery from your cell phone.<br><br>Of
 course, this would not help too much if you were being actively pursued
 by some hacker-assassin, but for the typical big-brother gestapo shit 
it's the best fix we have. <br>
<br>solid<br>-AnB<div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Dec 1, 2012 at 6:42 AM, Jake <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:jake@spaz.org" target="_blank">jake@spaz.org</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
I agree completely, except that it's not that you can be tracked by anyone who has the "legal authority" to request this information, but anyone who has the practical ability to acquire it.  This includes anyone who is friends with anyone who has access to the computer terminal that dispenses this information, not to mention lucky hackers.<br>

<br>
the fact is that the equipment dispensing phone record information, including the equipment that lets them LISTEN to your phone calls, does not require a warrant to be inserted into the slot before it is enabled.<br>
<br>
and actually the equipment produces no paper trail or electronic record or signal of any kind that it is being used, and this is enshrined in the CALEA (communications and law enforcement act of 1996) so that even the operator of the phone company cannot detect whether someone's conversation is being recorded or not.  not to be pedantic, but it's spelled out in the specification.  The "legal authority" of a person doesn't really come into the picture.<br>

<br>
most people don't realize that their phone is causing them to be tracked regardless of settings within the phone or whether it's a smart phone. Most people think that if they have a dumb phone they're not being tracked.  They don't realize that the towers actually have extra hardware just for the purpose of pinpointing every phone (for practical purposes too) and that this data is being logged for months or years for every single customer.<br>

<br>
and the AT&T iphone thing is real too, that happened to me and i told them that I didn't want a data plan for my smartphone and they said too bad and i said i'm leaving and they said Buh Bye and i said Hello Tmobile.<br>

<br>
here's a link to the german politician who made his records searchable with a playback map overlay thing, that really opened some peoples eyes:<br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/26/business/media/26privacy.html" target="_blank">http://www.nytimes.com/2011/<u></u>03/26/business/media/<u></u>26privacy.html</a><br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.zeit.de/digital/datenschutz/2011-03/data-protection-malte-spitz" target="_blank">http://www.zeit.de/digital/<u></u>datenschutz/2011-03/data-<u></u>protection-malte-spitz</a><br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.zeit.de/datenschutz/malte-spitz-data-retention" target="_blank">http://www.zeit.de/<u></u>datenschutz/malte-spitz-data-<u></u>retention</a><br>
<br>
-jake<br>
<br>
Ben wrote:<br>
<br>
I don't know where you get the impression that having a SIM card GSM phone gives you any more or less privacy than having a CDMA identified phone.<br>
<br>
Both phones identify themselves to the network with individual identity numbers (IMEI) and SIM cards also contain your identity.  Swapping the SIM to another phone will just alert them that you have switched devices.<br>

<br>
This is how AT&T identifies and decides to do "hey, you just dropped an iPhone onto our network, we're going to automatically without any additional authorization enable an iPhone specific data plan onto your account"<br>

<br>
Basically, if you carry a mobile phone, you have a location broadcasting device on you that can be tracked by the phone company and anyone who has the legal authority to request this information.<br>
<br>
<br>
On Wed, Nov 21, 2012 at 11:35 PM, N <jpk at <a href="http://pobox.com" target="_blank">pobox.com</a>> wrote:<br>
<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
 I found out by accident today that my BOOST MOBILE phone account is<br>
dumping all of their SIMS card phone customers and forcing us to buy <br>
</blockquote>
*new<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
*CDMA phones which presumably do not allow the batteries to be removed* <br>
</blockquote>
*and<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
thus will be just a traceable as all the modern phones out there.<br>
<br>
Is there any way I can convert my SIMS card phone to a CDMA phone?  I do<br>
not want to throw away my old phone nor the shards of privacy I have.<br>
<br>
Nick<br>
</blockquote>
______________________________<u></u>_________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net" target="_blank">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.<u></u>noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/<u></u>mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-<u></u>discuss</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>-- --<br>-- -- -- -- <br>-- -- -- -- -- --<br>@AndruByrne<br>CEO, Pachakutech<br><a href="http://www.pachakutech.com/intro.html" target="_blank">www.pachakutech.com/intro.html</a><br>
<br>
</div>