<html>
  <head>

    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#CCFFFF" text="#003300">
    <font face="Calibri">Jake wrote:<br>
      "</font>It's true that your reputation is on the line if you let
    someone in who makes trouble. If not the person opening the door,
    then who?"<br>
    <br>
    -the person who INVITED them is who. <br>
    <br>
    In other words, let's stop letting strangers in off the street,
    period, unless they can provide a verbal password, a Noisebridge ID
    card, a copy of the invitation, etc. <br>
    <br>
    The current practice is to let in whomever buzzes. Remove the
    buzzer, or implement verification methods. Otherwise, don't expect
    people to answer the buzzer. Then legit visitors will walk away,
    discouraged, never to return. <br>
    <br>
    Jake, you're asking hackers who are busy working on their projects
    to verify the decency of a stranger via a video camera, and to take
    personal responsibility if they guess wrong (plus the visitor has to
    figure out that they need to remove the camera barrier). With all
    due respect, i think that's not a workable solution. People do not
    come to Noisebridge to place themselves at risk for being blamed for
    someone else's thievery. The result is people will simply stop
    answering the buzzer. If that's your goal, then I guess your
    solution is best. <br>
    <br>
    How are you going to enforce this? If somebody innocently gives
    entry to somebody who later turns out to be a thief, do they both
    get kicked out of Noisebridge? It seems like a great way to alienate
    innocent people. <br>
    <br>
    Your solution seems based on the assumption that whomever gave
    access to the bad actor is a collaborator. That may be true in some
    cases, but surely not most. <br>
  </body>
</html>