<br><br>On Mon, Jan 28, 2013 at 10:22 PM, Seth David Schoen <<a href="mailto:schoen@loyalty.org">schoen@loyalty.org</a>> wrote:<br>> Danny O'Brien writes:<br>><br>>> as per last week's consensus, is here:<br>
>><br>>> this week's meeting should agree on whether we should send it or not<br>>><br>>> <a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/wiki/DreamworksReply">https://www.noisebridge.net/wiki/DreamworksReply</a><br>
><br>> I like this letter, but I'm not sure about the target audience.<br>> I see that the letter is addressed to a clearance agency, not to the<br>> producer or director, nor even to the studio.  Making these kinds of<br>
> requests (and maybe others that could be more strongly supported by<br>> copyright law) is the clearance agency's entire livelihood; they have<br>> credits for doing it for dozens of feature films.<br>><br>
<br>In my original draft I actually had a couple of sentences aimed more at the clearance agency employees (the end of the first para below, and the PS).<div><br></div><div>In the end, I took them out because really (as I guess the Wikileaks twitter account has already indicated), this is more of an open letter than an actual reply. An actual reply would have just been "No; go ahead." Also I don't think people actually respond that well to people telling them that their jobs are silly.</div>
<div><br></div><div>d.</div><div><br><br><blockquote style="margin:0 0 0 40px;border:none;padding:0px"><br>The whole idea you should need to ask us is patently ridiculous and we refuse<br>to be part of it. You should use exercise your fair use rights freely, withouut<br>
fear. We firmly believe that by pursuing all these clearances requests, you<br>risk watering-down your rights, and may end up losing them. Moreover, the<br>entire industry of begging and demanding clearances is makework, trapping<br>
otherwise brilliant people in a career that does nothing to improve the state<br>of the world, and stopping them from pursuing their real dreams.<br>So we say tell your friends at DreamWorks to publish and be damned without our<br>
permission. Tell them we fully support them in their brave stand, and can say,<br>with confidence, that the only conditions in which we would sue them and their<br>partners to the maximum damages entitled to us by law would be if it turned out<br>
hackers like us are completely amoral nihilists, out only for our own<br>egotistical ends. Given that you were so nice as to ask us, we can't imagine<br>you think that of us, do you?<br>Lots of love,<br>Noisebridge<br>
PS We meant it about your job. You sound really nice. Quit your job and do<br>something amazing instead.</blockquote><br><br><br><br><br>>Although telling the clearance agency how we disapprove of the<br>> permission culture makes sense, and it might be interesting to know<br>
> whether they have concerns about the legal and cultural aspects of<br>> their clearance work, I have a sense that they're not exactly the right<br>> audience.  They're not the ones who will be disappointed if they "can't"<br>
> use the Noisebridge logo in the film.  In fact, they have no creative<br>> role in the film at all!  Couldn't it make more sense to send the letter<br>> to someone with a clearer creative role, who might have stronger opinions<br>
> about the film's content?  For example, someone who might actually want<br>> to have a conversation with the studio about whether they can use the<br>> logo despite its being "uncleared" from the industry's perspective?<br>
><br>> --<br>> Seth David Schoen <<a href="mailto:schoen@loyalty.org">schoen@loyalty.org</a>>      |  No haiku patents<br>>      <a href="http://www.loyalty.org/~schoen/">http://www.loyalty.org/~schoen/</a>        |  means I've no incentive to<br>
>   FD9A6AA28193A9F03D4BF4ADC11B36DC9C7DD150  |        -- Don Marti<br>><br><br></div>