<div dir="ltr">Oop. I thought I had replied to this message last month! Sorry all! I hadn't meant to not respond!  Here is my response, and my followup... <div><br></div><div><br></div><div>--------------------------------------------------</div>
<div><div><br></div><div><div>Hey Sean, I looked up the Ubiquiti equipment, specifically, the AirRouter running AirOS. No, it doesn't have the per-user monitoring I am looking for. </div><div><br></div><div>I'm basically looking for this because I've got about 20 machines on my network, many not entirely under my control and I want to be able to say, "Hey, machine X is sucking up all the bandwidth, I better check it out."</div>
<div><br></div><div>As a side note, to connect all my machines, I've been using Netgear Ethernet over Power XET1001 devices through a 9,000 square foot building. They've worked flawlessly for a few years now, much more reliable than any wifi. Highly recommended.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Tony, I see that pfsense can run the Bandwidthd package, which is what I'm looking for! Here was a good overview video of pfsense.</div><div><br></div><div>OpenWRT can run bandwidthd as well so I am looking for a fast (400mhz+) wifi router for inexpensive right now.</div>
<div><br></div><div>I'm being attracted to OpenWRT because it runs on the (less expensive) routers like Linksys WRT54G, Buffalo etc. It looks like there are several routers that might do the job. For example the 680mhz  Buffalo WZR-600DHP. But before I jump in, I would love to hear someone's experience with such devices. There are just so many to choose from: <a href="http://wiki.openwrt.org/toh/start">http://wiki.openwrt.org/toh/start</a></div>
<div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Does anyone have a recommendation for running OpenWRT with Bandwidthd on wifi router hardware?</div><div><br></div><div>Or maybe if someone is running Pfsense on wifi router hardware, I could go in that direction too if there's a howto guide out there.</div>
</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>--------------------------------------------------</div><div style>I sent another message, but no one else got it until now. Here it is:</div><div style>--------------------------------------------------</div>
<div style><span style="font-size:13px;font-family:arial,sans-serif">I'm about an hour into using my new </span><span style="font-size:13px;font-family:arial,sans-serif">TP-LINK TL-WR1043ND router with <span class="">OpenWRT</span> and Bandwidthd. It's looking very promising!</span><br>
</div><div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px"><br></div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">The stock firmware on the router wan't terrible but didn't have all the graphing I wanted. So I installed<span class="">OpenWRT</span>.</div>
<div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px"><br></div><div style="font-family:arial,sans-serif;font-size:13px">After spending an hour reading the manuals, installation was way simple<div>* fetch the firmware mentioned in the <a href="http://wiki.openwrt.org/toh/tp-link/tl-wr1043nd" target="_blank">hardware-specific documentation</a></div>
<div>* install the firmware by "upgrading" the router. 3 clicks total</div><div>* tada, the router mostly "just works"</div><div>* enable wifi (the documentation clearly mentions that wifi is turned off by default), 3 clicks "enable wifi on the LAN, on the WAN, Submit!)</div>
<div>* tada, the router is totally working</div><div><br></div><div>To install Bandwidthd</div><div>* I tried using the web interface something wasn't working right. I tried to jump-start Bandwidthd from within the ssh interfce but nuthun doin. So I uninstalled it from the web interface and the couple commands mentioned at the top of the <a href="http://wiki.openwrt.org/doc/howto/bandwidthd" target="_blank">Bandwidthd documentation</a> from the ssh interface</div>
<div>* I then went to <a href="http://192.168.1.1/bandwidthd" target="_blank">http://192.168.1.1/bandwidthd</a> and darn if stats weren't magically showing up!</div><div>* I've been having trouble with my wifi dying unexpectedly. I'll keep playing with it. I uninstalled bandwidthd and the wifi seems more stable but I'm still in process....</div>
<div><br></div><div>I was totally happy with the Tomato Firmware except for not having per-user stats info. I'm pretty sure I'll get this working peachy keen soon. Email me privately if you want more info (I don't want to bother the mailing list if there's no interest)</div>
</div></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>--------------------------------------------------</div><div style>And here is yet another message I THOUGHT I had sent to the list. But no!</div><div style>--------------------------------------------------</div>
<div style><br></div><div style>After playing with OpenWRT for a while, I tried Toastman's Tomato, a Tomato firmware mod. It worked great right out of the box! I think it has everything I need and want. And it Just Works. I wrote a blog post about it.</div>
<div style><br></div><div><a href="http://www.lee.org/blog/2013/04/07/wrt54gl-router-upgrade-to-toastman-tomato/">http://www.lee.org/blog/2013/04/07/wrt54gl-router-upgrade-to-toastman-tomato/</a><br></div><div><br></div><div>
<br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Mar 11, 2013 at 3:12 PM, Tony Arcieri <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:tony.arcieri@gmail.com" target="_blank">tony.arcieri@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr">pfsense is a popular open source firewall distribution based on FreeBSD, with a nice web UI that makes admining it easy:<div>
<br></div><div><a href="http://www.pfsense.org/" target="_blank">http://www.pfsense.org/</a><br></div>

<div><br></div><div>If you're looking for a box to run it on, you might consider one based on the ALIX boards. They're practically designed with pfsense in mind:</div><div><br></div><div><a href="http://store.netgate.com/Netgate-m1n1wall-2D2-Red-P221.aspx" target="_blank">http://store.netgate.com/Netgate-m1n1wall-2D2-Red-P221.aspx</a><br>


</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div class="im">On Fri, Mar 8, 2013 at 9:32 PM, Lee Sonko <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:lee@lee.org" target="_blank">lee@lee.org</a>></span> wrote:<br>
</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">

<div dir="ltr"><p>I run Tomato firmware on my WRT54GL router and I'm really happy with it. I'd like to find a router and firmware that will give me per-user bandwidth stats. I think that open-wrt and one of the bandwidth packages I can get with it is the right thing to get. But I can't figure out which router to get. I just want 4 ethernet ports and decent wifi at a decent price. This seems like it would be a well trodden path but I'm not finding "the answer" quickly. Some cite reliability problems with routers, I've seen a lot of oddly qualified recommendations. Does anyone have any solid suggestions from personal experience?</p>





<p><br></p><p>And it seems odd that the WRT54GL still might be the best choice after being in production for some so many years.</p>
</div>
<br></div><div class="im">_______________________________________________<br>
Noisebridge-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net" target="_blank">Noisebridge-discuss@lists.noisebridge.net</a><br>
<a href="https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss" target="_blank">https://www.noisebridge.net/mailman/listinfo/noisebridge-discuss</a><br>
<br></div></blockquote></div><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br>Tony Arcieri<br>
</font></span></div>
</blockquote></div><br></div>