<html>
  <head>
    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html;
      charset=ISO-8859-1">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    Hi Noisebridge<br>
    <br>
    <div align="justify">The Instructables/Jameco hack went down
      successfully yesterday, Sunday, at Noisebridge. <br>
      <br>
      You can view our circuit art, blinking in all it's glory, on the
      worktable against the woodshop wall, next to the reception desk. <br>
      <br>
      I worked with John-who-has-a-British-sounding-accent, plus got
      some scientific narration on the side from Jonathan who makes and
      sells brain devices of some sort. Martin also did some
      breadboarding with us. <br>
      <br>
      Jameco donated a buncha weird parts to Noisebridge, including
      LED's, crystal oscillators, 555 timers, capacitors.... Our
      mission: make something that does something. Not as easy as it
      sounds.<br>
      <br>
      The result:<br>
      A 9-volt battery driving an LM317 power-supply outputting 5 volts,
      driving a tiny sliver of crystallized rock into resonance at
      one-and-a-half thousand vibrations per second, divided in half, 8
      times, by a binary counter, down to a speed of about six
      vibrations per-second, driving an LED. <br>
      <br>
      Meaning, we made a light blink 6 times per second. <br>
      <br>
      Then we strapped some LED's onto the next two significant bits of
      the counter, to get blinkers at 12 vibes-per-sec, and 24
      vibes-per-sec. In red, green, and yellow. <br>
      <br>
      And i'm happy to say, not one 555 was used. This was my design
      goal (since everybody uses 555's for everything). <br>
      <br>
      Video soon. <br>
      <br>
      It's easy to breadboard. If you'd like to build one o these
      critters, all (or most) of the parts needed are sitting on the
      table next to the magnifier lamp. <br>
      <br>
      I recommend you simply copy my circuit. It's the simpler circuit,
      on a single breadboard, with a bouquet of three LED's. Don't copy
      the other two boards (the one's that look less tidy). <br>
      <br>
      Here's the instructable, which will go on Instructables.com (after
      editing):<br>
      <br>
      Steps:<br>
      Hook up the power supply first (battery to the LM317), and hook up
      a voltmeter set to DC to the middle pin (output) and battery
      negative. Twist the trimpot with a flathead screwdriver until
      you're getting exactly 5 volts, or as close to 5 as you can get. <br>
      <br>
      Next, add the crystal oscillator. Notice that there are only three
      connections to the oscillator, even tho it has 12 pins. Connect
      your oscillator output (pin 1) and battery negative to a
      multimeter that has a frequency counter, or use a scope, and
      ensure you've got a solid vibration coming out of the crystal. If
      you see a 60 Hz signal, that's just electrical hum in the air, NOT
      your oscillator. <br>
      <br>
      Next, throw in the counter. Those connections can be a little
      tricky, so trace your wires carefully. To make the counter work
      right, send the crystal output to counter pins 11 <i>and </i>13.
      There are a couple other pins which need to be tied to ground or
      +V, i will post that info here soon. Look at my board to see how i
      did it. Thanks, John-who-has-a-British-sounding-accent for
      figuring that out. <br>
      <br>
      Datasheets:<br>
      if you copy my circuit exactly you won't need to look at these. <br>
      <br>
      Voltage Regulator, which John says is really a current regulator.<br>
      <a href="http://www.fairchildsemi.com/ds/LM/LM317.pdf">http://www.fairchildsemi.com/ds/LM/LM317.pdf</a><br>
      <br>
      Crystal Oscillator (look at the silver sardine-can on the board to
      get the part number, find the number in this PDF to get the
      pinouts)<br>
      <a href="http://pccomponents.com/datasheets/OFC-OSC.PDF">http://pccomponents.com/datasheets/OFC-OSC.PDF</a><br>
      <br>
      8-bit Counter<br>
      <a
href="http://pdf1.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/view/28018/TI/SN74LS590N.html">http://pdf1.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/view/28018/TI/SN74LS590N.html</a><br>
      -The datasheet says it has an "output register", but i think they
      just mean it has a parallel output (vs. a serial output, which
      sends 8 bits of data out through one pin). <br>
      <br>
      -Mod: The goal is to get some irregularity or syncopated pattern
      with only a very simple hack. Try sending a DIFFERENT crystal
      oscillator, running at a different speed, into the "register
      clock" or another input on the counter. I have no idea what it
      would do-- likely nothing interesting. Note, using a faster
      crystal is not desirable, since that will just give you blinks
      that are too fast too see. <br>
      <br>
      Parts that get connected to the LM317 power chip:<br>
      <br>
      2 Caps<br>
      1 uf and .1 uf. The numbers on the caps say 104 and 105. Just see
      what i used. <br>
      <br>
      A trimpot.<br>
      You'll need to find a 1k trimpot in our component corner. Good
      luck. Try Radio Shack. <br>
      <br>
      A resistor. <br>
      About 250 ohms. <br>
      <br>
      And, yes, there was pizza. 1/2 vegetarian with pesto and garlic,
      1/2 pepperoni with extra cheese. Make a note of it. <br>
    </div>
    <br>
    <br>
    <div class="moz-signature"><font size="+1"> Johny Radio<br>
        <img alt=""
src="http://us.123rf.com/400wm/400/400/robodread/robodread1201/robodread120100030/11882514-ear-and-sound-waves.jpg"
          moz-do-not-send="true" width="150"><br>
        Stick It In Your Ear!<br>
      </font> <br>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>