noise: [Noisebridge-discuss] re Dynamo Regulator Help

Henner Zeller h.zeller at acm.org
Mon Jul 22 01:43:51 UTC 2013


On 21 July 2013 18:33, Johny Radio <johnyradio at gmail.com> wrote:

>  On 7/21/2013 6:20 PM, Henner Zeller wrote:
>
> are the motors identical ? If so, then the motor probaly generates a
> voltage in a similar order of magnitude (minus the losses).
>
>
> yes. what are the losses?
>

If they're identical, then this should be in the same order of magnitude.
To know exactly: Measure it :)
This heavily depends on the motors. You really need to measure the voltage
at the output of your generator motor to know where to start.


>
>
>   >>If you voltage is _way_ to high (which I suspect is happening here),
> then you can blow the input stage
>
>
> if the input stage op amp blows from over-voltage on the input, would the
> power amp chip still be protected?
>

Maybe :)

> If the motor doesn't work anymore, something blew inside.
>
>
> that much i figured out.
>
>   Maybe one winding is gone ? Or there are overvoltage protection diodes
> that fried. Or some mechanical failure in the commutator. 60000 RPM is
> pretty high.
>
>
> 6,000, not 60,000
>

Uh,  you said thousands per second. 1000/sec translates into 60000 rounds
per minute.


>
>
>    If it looks like a sine with one side folded over to the top (so more
> like camel humps), then it is the commutated output (so: a DC motor).
> If you can operate the motor with DC, it is a DC motor.
>
>
> def a DC motor, but not seeing a rectified sine on the scope. Seeing two
> super-imposed sines on the scope, which seems impossible.
>

... or the scope doesn't trigger.


> But if the motor is outputting ten's of volts, then maybe i'm overdriving
> the scope, and it's readings are inaccurate.
>

Scopes often can do 10s of volts if you have the right range. If it was
overdriving, you'd see a clipping.

-h


>
> Thx!
>
>
>
>  Johny Radio
>
> Stick It In Your Ear!
>
>


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