Talk:Hackerspace Design Patterns 2.0

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Mission Statement(s), e.g., "Excellence" -- Enforcing and Re-inforcing Hacking "Purity"

Imposter Syndrome Anti-Pattern -- *everyone* has it

Shower Pattern now has an Anti-Pattern,
as does the Kitchen Pattern.

Territorial Anti-Pattern: people carving out a spot in the space (others too uncomfortable to use "their" space). People who belong tend to drift away.

Reboot Pattern: turn off and on. Invite people to help re-create the space -- creates excitement as everyone feels part of creating the space (like when it's new).

Greeters Pattern: welcome everyone, give tour which includes what space is and is not about. Supports Cultural Immune System Pattern.

Conflict Resolution Pattern

-- having a system helps!

Gender Equality at spaces

Burnout by community members (or board/officers)

Organizational structures: anarchy, board-run

Decision-making: consensus, majority vote

Cultural Immune System Pattern:
Problem: You want people in your hackerspace who are good for your community, and want to keep them happy and safe -- and you don't want to attract people who will hurt your community or drive away people who are good for your community.
Solution: Social control, "Cultural immune system"

Simple diagram of Hackerspace Time-loop Pattern:
New People & Ideas ====> Productivity & Growth ====> Entrenchment/Stagnation
/\ ....................................................................................................... ||
|| ....................................................................................................... ||
|| ....................................................................................................... ||
|| ....................................................................................................... \/
Entrenchment/Stagnation <=== Productivity & Growth <=== New People & Ideas


http://geekfeminism.wikia.com/wiki/Feminist_hackerspace_design_patterns

Periodic Show & Tell get-togethers (but don't want to scare people off who aren't "experts" -- see "Imposter Syndrom" Anti-Pattern)

Greet new people, give tour, share about the space's culture from the start.

Remind people when they miss a membership dues payment. Alternatively, require all members pay via an automatic payment system (like paypal).

Automate as much of the busy-work as possible (help avoid burn-out).

Cleanliness -- things can get messy quickly at hackerspaces.

Project storage management isn't easy.

Getting rid of things that aren't used -- otherwise things pile up and get in the way.

Accepting donations is cool -- having policies on when to say "no" to a donation is important.

What draws people to hackerspaces? Community (first), Tools & Equip (second). Getting new stuff should attract more people for the Community.

Maintaining tools & equipment -- how to do it?

Rules & Procedures -- how to disseminate them so everyone knows them? Keep the rules simple to understand. Put up signs that are easy to read at a glance to remind people where needed.

Attract people with Classes and Workshops and Talks and Demos.

Safety for people and tools & equipment: have classes. Some spaces have certification.

Empower people to spread the joy and attract people to your space.

Get rid of old stuffs that are no longer being used, and re-make spaces within your hackerspace that are no longer being used -- this makes way for what's growing in your hackerspace.

The name can attract or repel people. E.g., "Lab" tends to attract males.

How to communicate? Email lists can be unwieldy (and attract trolls). IRC can be a time-sink (and attract trolls). User forum. Wiki. Slack (and non-corporate versions). Usually, there's not a single method that works for all community members.

Security: cameras? Non-anonymous door access system?

Separate tools for space maintenance, or for special purposes?


Notes from Red Mountain Makers, by Shirley Hicks:
http://www.velochicdesign.com/category/makerspaces/

How to Start a Hackerspace on the Adafruit blog, by Eric Michaud:
https://blog.adafruit.com/2012/11/12/how-to-start-a-hackerspace/

How to Create a Hackerspace, by Mitch Altman:
http://makezine.com/magazine/how-to-create-a-hackerspace/

I've updated this "1.0" pattern some time ago to reflect developments that hackbases brought. https://wiki.hackerspaces.org/The_Roommate_Anti-Pattern https://hackerspaces.org/wiki/Hackbases - David Totalism Hackbase/Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain


Most people have strong opinions. When talk of certain discussion topics come up, people tend to email (or to irc, etc), and start off saying they aren't coming to discuss such topics, but they actually end up dead against the particular proposal. Then discussion becomes stifled. (Especially disruptive for groups making decisions with consensus, but disruptive for majority-vote, too.) Solution: Continue online discussion for those who will remain resistant to the groupthink pressure du jour, and move comments and discussion to in-person for the majority of persons willing to fully hear-out and express both sides of the discussion topic in question. Or, to move such conversations one-on-one, for someone who is an active part of the community and is out-of-town at the moment.

Sudo Room / The Omni's user-friendly freenode IRC: https://sudoroom.org/chat/

NB's "glorified IRC" Slack (walled garden) portal: https://noisebridge.net/wiki/Slack

NB's highly-verbose IRC portal: https://noisebridge.net/wiki/IRC

From Sudo Room / The Omni / Labitat, by Marc Juul: https://pad.riseup.net/p/sudopatterns

From NYC Resistor, by Holly Hudson: http://wiki.nycresistor.com/wiki/The_NYC_Resistor_Model_of_Hackerspace_Governance

I would update the "Old Hardware" pattern to say that you should not usually accept donations unless agreed by consensus first. I would call this the "Cathode Ray Tube anti-pattern". All things can be reused, but leaving things on a shelf is not re-use. In my experience, it is very easy to acquire things and difficult to dispose of them. Some hackspaces will have to pay to dispose of waste.

I would expand the 'Community' pattern to say: set up a mailing list, wiki and IRC channel, and everything else you like. There can be long debates about mailman vs Google Groups vs forum software, IRC vs Slack or MediaWiki vs ikiwiki - if someone is willing to maintain any of those for a year, let them do it, and let people vote with their feet.


Mediation / Conflict Resolution Pattern:
1. assume it's interpersonal, and work it out one-on-one
2. pick mediator from list of volunteers
3. mediator ensures everyone feels listened-to, and safe
          (mediator also looks for possible feelings from one or more parties that could indicate that this is more than an interpersonal problem)
4. ask those involved what behaviors they are willing to change
5. by end of mediation (more sessions, if necessary), everyone involved should feel good enough to continue to use the space


Clean up after yourself (and a little bit more).


Greeter Pattern: Everyone who comes to visit should be greeted, made to feel welcome, and given a tour if they are new. The tour includes what the space is about, and what it is not about. In this way the unique culture of the space is continually passed on to new people. To help further facilitate the passing along of the spaces culture, it helps to have a bar/place in the space where people can congregate and get Club Mate (or other drinks).